Opinion

Letters to the editor

by
September 08, 2017

Retired Goulburn Valley Suns player and coach Nick Kalafatis has left a lasting legacy at the club.

Extraordinary legacy

- Mick Crisera, president, and Paul Uniacke, vice-president, GV Suns Football Club

Nick Kalafatis’ decision to retire as player and coach for the GV Suns marks a key milestone for the GV Suns and soccer in the Goulburn Valley (‘Nick gives final tick’, August 29).

In the chaos of our first season we had less than six weeks to assemble a squad and establish the off-field club requirements that come with a National Premier League licence.

As a result we relied on a large number of Melbourne players to fill our senior squads.

Nick took the helm in 2015, our second year, and from day one has lived our club’s ethos of nurturing local talent to create individual players and a team that is capable of matching the best in the state week after week.

Nick’s success has never been more obvious.

Our senior squad is dominated by local talent that has been developed under his leadership.

The squad has grown, from finishing eighth to equal third this year — equal with Melbourne City with all the off-field benefits they enjoy.

We were the highest ranked regional club ahead of clubs based in much bigger centres in Albury, Ballarat and Bendigo, and we ‘‘blooded’’ more than 12 new players who were given the opportunity to step up from their under-16s, under-18s and under-20s to play with and against the best.

Nick has ticked all the boxes for his club and for country soccer by retaining and developing talent and delivering results.

This combination means we are punching well above our weight and we have created a development pathway that will see local talent continuing to come through our ranks and sustaining our success for years to come.

It would be easy to stop there and let the stats do the talking, but Nick’s contribution has been at all levels across our club.

From refereeing junior matches to watching from the sidelines and working with our coaches.

Nick has left an extraordinary legacy for our club and our region.

From the entire GV Suns family, thank you Nick.

Power of ideologies

- Jiri Kolenaty, Rushworth

Doctors can save hundreds of lives, but fanatical individuals can destroy thousands of them.

We tend to underestimate the power of ideologies, because they are abstract.

But when put to use in the real life, they can become very cruel and destructive.

There has been a lot said about the individual, as well as religious freedom.

But when people are posing a threat to the society, their freedom has to be restricted.

The same applies to political movements and religions which endorse violence, primitive rites and sacrifices.

Human race has made a great progress in many fields, but still has a long way to go before it reaches a lasting peace.

Free parking helpful

- David Sinclair, Albury

As a former Sheppartonian, l’ve followed with great interest the debate around revitalisation of the Maude St Mall.

Like Robert Dodds (September 5), I’m amazed at John Gray’s constant negative attacks on free parking.

I’ve lived in Albury for the past 15 years, a city that offers free timed parking in a CBD bookended by two supermarkets.

I’ve no evidence of what revenue Albury City might miss through free parking, just anecdotal evidence of a flourishing CBD with an ant trail between two major supermarkets.

For years there has been so much talk around this issue with limited action.

The City of Greater Shepparton needs to get traffic back into Maude St and scrap parking fees, so the CBD can trade on equal terms with the outlying shopping centres.

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